Living on the River: A great place to harness the positive health effects of Blue Mind and Green Time

Living on the River

Living on the River: A great place to harness the positive health effects of Blue Mind and Green Time

Have you heard of the Blue Mind theory? It’s a hypothesis popularized by writer and researcher Wallace J. Nichols in his 2014 book Blue Mind, where he details how the mind enters a meditative state when you are near, in, under, or on the water. His book is full of scientific studies and cultural examples of how living near water can improve the quality of life and our health in general. And many Blue Zones, where people live the longest, are located near oceans and large bodies of water.

But do we really need a whole book to tell us this? We all intuitively know that we are attracted to water and feel better when we are near it. After all, our bodies are composed of 70 percent water, so it makes sense.

Living and working along the shores of the Hudson River, we can attest to this idea of Blue Mind and its positive effects. After all, who hasn’t stood on the shore of a river, lake, stream, or ocean and felt their mind slip into a calm, altered state? Time stops and you become highly present, swept away in the experience and the awe of it all. Meditation on tap; no mantra required.

Living close to the water provides other salubrious qualities. For example, researchers have proven that the very sight of natural water is enough to stimulate your brain to produce neurochemicals that encourage blood flow.

And there are physiological benefits to living near water. For example, did you know it has the power to boost your immune system and improve your resistance against bacteria and viruses? Yes, living near water can increase your white blood cell count because many water-loving plants produce airborne chemicals called phytoncides. These antimicrobial compounds increase the production of white blood cells, which can decrease your vulnerability to infections.

Blue Mind theory aside, there is also the popular concept of Green Time. This is simply the idea that being outdoors in green and natural settings can profoundly affect how we feel. And studies tell us that Green Time counters the adverse effects of too much screen time. Early exposure to morning sunlight helps set our circadian rhythms for a better night’s sleep, in contrast to so much blue light from devices that keeps us awake.

Nature positively impacts brain function by restoring energy and focus, whereas the world we live in today, oftentimes spent in front of a screen, tends to lead to sensory overload. Not to mention that sitting is considered the new smoking, so sitting in front of any screen for long periods is a no-no.

The site of the future River’s Edge community is located along the Hudson River on 19 acres, ready for walking, biking, gardening, hiking, pickle balling, stretching, and doing tai chi or yoga. It’s like your own private Central Park—but without the crush of people or the unsafe feeling. Here, you can let your guard down and relax. At River’s Edge, residents will have the best of all worlds. Living in a gorgeous, luxury high-rise just 30 minutes from Manhattan, with Mother Nature right outside the door.

You’ll easily immerse yourself in Green Time and Blue Mind. Go for a sunrise walk along the shores of the Hudson River, dance under the moonlight, garden, and contribute to your brain’s ability for creative problem solving, strong memory, and reducing cortisol, which is the stress hormone that researchers have dubbed “the death hormone” because it seems to hasten aging.

Have a dog? At River’s Edge, there will be plenty of room to roam, with more than a mile of trails and a dog park. Residents will also enjoy the sculpture garden, featuring more than two dozen towering works, and the private Zen garden for quiet contemplation. Finally, residents will have the opportunity to grow their own flowers and vegetables in a garden space.

So, whether you want more Blue Mind, Green Time, Zen time, or me time, River’s Edge will offer many opportunities to access and connect with the natural world.